The Perfect Health Diet Review

 

The Perfect Heath Diet

The Perfect Heath Diet by Paul Jaminet and Shou-Ching Jaminet is my new favorite nutrition guide.  For me it serves as a great recap of the research I have been doing in the past year.  I am really excited to finally be able to refer people to a single place to understand the choices that I’ve been making, even though I was making most of them prior to reading it.  The book is so approachable because it sticks to the ideal maintenance diet and seems to broach almost every mainstream “Paleo” topic.  Just some of the topics the authors address:

  • A Paleo / Primal Diet
  • Weston A Price nutrition from Nourishing Traditions
  • Intermittent Fasting (Martin Berkham’s LeanGains, Dave Asprey’s BulletProof Diet)
  • Circadian Rhythm and Thyroid Health (James Wilson’s Adrenal Fatigue)

Here’s a neat infographic from their website that helps explain the diet:

The part of this book that is most refreshing to me is the approach to a moderate carbohydrate consumption of “safe starches”.  Some other Paleo guides are terrified of both starches and the weighing and measuring food.  I always find it silly that someone would go through the tremendous and difficult effort of removing Wheat from their diet, but refuse to take a few minutes each day to measure their food.  One place I failed to lose weight with the Paleo Diet was by consuming far, far too much fruit.  By reducing my consumption of starches without entering ketosis, I really craved fruit every day.  I would eat a pound or two of fruit in a sitting.

The Perfect Health Diet recommends 400 calories from safe starches and 200 calories of sugar from plants, fruits and vegetables per day.  The safe starches they list that I am likely to consume are white rice, potato, winter squashes, sweet potatoes, and some others.   The 600 calories from carbohydrate a day (150 grams) is specifically chosen as enough to provide energy to your brain and muscles.   More would be added on days of high intensity exercise.

If I could improve the PHD book, I would first remove any reference to the China Study.  This study is just too controversial.  I would also lighten up on the animal studies.  Hopefully the authors looked for human studies that could be used wherever possible.  I might add a Quantified Self topic as well.  With the improvements they will see any reader will certainly wish they had taken a baseline of their health – be it cheesy “before” pictures, a Wellness FX test, or whatever other kind of bloodwork they can get.

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One response to “The Perfect Health Diet Review”

  1. bjjcaveman says :

    I also just purchased this book… I like what I’ve read so far… but I’m think I’m going to try for nutritional ketosis for at least a few more months to see how far that can take me in terms of body recomposition. The idea of ketosis and having your body burn more of it’s own fat just sounds so appealing. Hopefully it will work in practice for me.

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